Daily Bible Readings – Monday, June 10, 2013

Prayer Psalm: 65

Prayer Point.  David praises God in this psalm for his forgiveness, his creative and saving power, and for the way he provides for his people.  How have you experienced God’s forgiveness, power, and provision?  Offer up God a prayer of thanks in your own words.

Luke 18:31-43

Pray. Ask the Holy Spirit to help you understand what you are reading.

Read. Read the passage slowly either alone or in a group and answer the following questions:

Listen. What is the passage saying? What are the main points? You can use the following “Background” and “Pay close attention to …”  sections to help you understand the main points of this passage.

Background. Jesus has already predicted his death twice in the Gospel of Luke ( see Luke 9:22 and 9:43-45) and yet the disciples are having difficulty understanding what he is saying. The trouble is not with his words. You and I can plainly see what Jesus is foretelling. The big reason for the misunderstanding was that they couldn’t reconcile the “Son of Man” in Daniel 7:13-14 with Jesus’ “son of man” who suffers and dies.

Today’s reading fairly drips with irony. There is only one person who sees Jesus clearly and he is blind.

Pay close attention to …

  • Read about the Son of Man in Daniel 7:13-14 and see if that vision explains why the disciples have a hard time imaging Jesus the Son of Man dying.
  • How the blind man sees Jesus. What does he call him? Note that David was Israel’s greatest king. The people of Israel were waiting for a son (descendent) of David to come and restore Israel’s fortunes and establish God’s eternal kingdom of peace and justice on earth.
  • The persistence of the blind man and what it says about his faith. Compare this to Jesus’ parable in Luke 18:1-8.

Obey. What is God asking me to do?

Share. What can I share and with whom can I share it?

Repent. How have I failed to obey and share what God is asking me to do? Confess those failures to God and ask for his forgiveness.

Believe. Which of God’s promises would I need to believe in order to obey and share what I have read?

Final Prayer. Pray for the faith to believe the promises of God so that you might obey and share what you have learned.

2 Corinthians 10:1-18

Pray. Ask the Holy Spirit to help you understand what you are reading.

Read. Read the passage slowly either alone or in a group and answer the following questions:

Listen. What is the passage saying? What are the main points? You can use the following “Background” and “Pay close attention to …”  sections to help you understand the main points of this passage.

Background. 2 Corinthians is a letter from the Apostle Paul to the church in Corinth. Because Paul traveled extensively throughout the Roman Empire starting new churches, he used this method to continue to guide the churches while he was away.

Opponents of Paul visited the church in Corinth calling into question his credibility. In the Roman world, not unlike today, power, authority and respect were linked to a person’s skill as a communicator. How something was said was more important than the content of the message. ”The weapons of the world” Paul speaks of in verse 4 are flashy, powerful speeches.

Pay close attention to …

  • What Paul’s authority lacks according to Roman standards.
  • Where Paul’s authority comes from as opposed to his speaking skills. (See verse 8; Acts 9:1-19).
  • The purpose Paul’s of God-given authority (verse 8).
  • The contrast between Paul’s ability as a speaker and his skill as a letter writer (verse 10).
  • Why Paul hopes that the Corinthian church’s faith will continue to grow. What will he be free to do when that happens?

Obey. What is God asking me to do?

Share. What can I share and with whom can I share it?

Repent. How have I failed to obey and share what God is asking me to do? Confess those failures to God and ask for his forgiveness.

Believe. Which of God’s promises would I need to believe in order to obey and share what I have read?

Final Prayer. Pray for the faith to believe the promises of God so that you might obey and share what you have learned.

1 Samuel 1:1-20

Pray. Ask the Holy Spirit to help you understand what you are reading.

Read. Read the passage slowly either alone or in a group and answer the following questions:

Listen. What is the passage saying? What are the main points? Use the “Background” below to help you understand the main points of this passage.

Background. 

Elkanah (meaning: acquired by God, i.e. perhaps in exchange for firstborn [Num. 3:15; 45] a son of Korah – The Companion Bible p. 367) was a well-to-do man from “the hill country of Ephraim” (v.1) who had two wives: Hannah (meaning Grace) and Peninnah (meaning Pearl). He was of the tribe of Levi, of the sons of Korah – those who waited on the LORD in the tabernacle. Like Jacob’s two wives, one was favored and one was not. Hannah, though she had no children, was more favored than Peninnah, who had a brood of young. While the story of Samuel’s origins has some similarity to Jacob’s life, the story also bears some resemblance to the origins of John the Baptist almost a thousand years later. Hannah and Elizabeth were “barren”. Both women bore sons and both were dedicated to the LORD from an early age. Both were prophets and both played key roles in the Davidic monarchy: Samuel to establish David and John the Baptist to announce the coming of the Messiah, David’s successor. Probably because she was not (as) favored as Hannah, Peninnah used to provoke Hannah to tears each year when the “family” went up to Shiloh (i.e., “where the tabernacle and the ark were” The Companion Bible p. 367) to make their offerings to the LORD. [There is a similarity here between Sarah and Hagar too!] Evidently this was rather acute for Hannah for she went into the temple to ask the LORD to bless her with a son, and if he did so, she would dedicate all his life to the service of the LORD. Eli, the chief priest was very old and his eyesight wasn’t what it used to be, so when he saw Hannah praying (for she was moving her lips but not speaking aloud) he mistook her to be drunk. He admonished her against such behavior whereupon she told him of her plea to God. Eli sends her off with his blessing and a hope that God would “visit” her.

Well, he did. By the time of the next yearly sacrifice, Hannah had delivered of a son whom she named Samuel (meaning “asked of God”, or “God-heard” The Companion Bible p. 367). Hannah’s plan is to wean her son and then leave him at the temple. Her reproach is removed. Hannah was blessed with three more sons and two daughters. Why was Hannah so eager to “lend” her son [for the rest of his life] to the LORD from such an early age? (I think it was a couple of things: an act of thanksgiving for removing her reproach; and an act of faith that the LORD would use and bless Samuel in his service to God.) Her prayers were heard (and answered) which might serve as encouragement to others who knew of her plight.

Obey. What is God asking me to do?

Share. What can I share and with whom can I share it?

Repent. How have I failed to obey and share what God is asking me to do? Confess those failures to God and ask for his forgiveness.

Believe. Which of God’s promises would I need to believe in order to obey and share what I have read?

Final Prayer. Pray for the faith to believe the promises of God so that you might obey and share what you have learned.

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s