Daily Bible Readings – Friday, March 29, 2013 – Good Friday

Prayer Psalm: 40

Prayer Point. How can we repay God for his kindness and salvation? We can do nothing but offer ourselves in gratitude. Think about the ways God has demonstrated grace in your life. Confess to him the areas of your life you are afraid to offer him. Tell him your troubles and ask him to save you once again.

John 13:36-38

Background.  The setting is the upper room where Jesus celebrated the “Last Supper” with his disciples.  This is the night of Jesus’ betrayal and arrest;  the night before his crucifixion. He has just announced to his disciples that he will be leaving.

Pay close attention to …

  • How Peter reacts to the news that Jesus will be leaving and that he cannot follow.
  • The difference between what Peter says he is willing to do and what Jesus predicts he will do.

Listen. Believe. Obey. Share.

What is the passage saying? About God? About ourselves? (Listen)
What is God asking us to believe? (Believe)
What is God asking us to do? (Obey)
Who can we share this with? (Share)

1 Peter 1:10-20

Background.  The church that Peter wrote to greatly revered the prophets, who, by the Holy Spirit, predicted the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. The writings of these prophets can be read in our Old Testament.  They include: Jeremiah, Isaiah, Ezekiel, Daniel and many other minor prophets.  Imagine their shock when Peter says that these great men were serving them, those who would receive the good news of Jesus Christ.

Pay close attention to …

  • The life we are called to live in response to the good news of Jesus (verse 13).
  • The life we are to live because we are God’s children (verse 14-15).
  • The life we are to live because God is a righteous, impartial judge (verse 17).
  • What it cost God to purchase us (verses 18-20).

Listen. Believe. Obey. Share.

What is the passage saying? About God? About ourselves? (Listen)
What is God asking us to believe? (Believe)
What is God asking us to do? (Obey)
Who can we share this with? (Share)

Genesis 22:1-14

Background. Jesus is called the Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world.  The lamb or the ram in this story touches on this theme.

Pay close attention to…

  • In this dark and nearly horrific story where do we see glimpses of God the Father and where do we see glimpses of Christ?
  • Think about who will later give up his only Son to take the place of Isaac

Listen. Believe. Obey. Share.

What is the passage saying? About God? About ourselves? (Listen)
What is God asking us to believe? (Believe)
What is God asking us to do? (Obey)
Who can we share this with? (Share)

Wisdom 1:6-2:1, 12-22

Wisdom of Solomon

Wisdom is one of the books of the apocrypha which is not part of the bible we use.  The following is from The New Interpreter’s Study Bible:

The Wisdom of Solomon (also known as the book of Wisdom) is an anonymous work.  It is clear, however, that the author adopts the persona of King Solomon.  For example, the author’s quest for wisdom in Wisdom 7:1-14 can be compared to Solomon’s plea in 1 Kings 3:6-9.  Also, the author’s reference to God’s command to build the Temple (Wis. 9:7-8) can only parallel the Solomon of the OT.  Pseudepigraphal writing — i.e., writing under the assumed name of a famous person — is a well-attested genre of the ancient world, and the Wisdom of Solomon is one celebrated example.  The author of this book, therefore is conventionally referred to as “Pseudo-Solomon” (here abbreviated Ps-Solomon).

It is almost universally accepted that the book of Wisdom was written in Greek by an Alexandrian Jew.  Although some scholars have argued for an original Hebrew or Aramaic version, these arguments have not proved persuasive.  The presence of occasional Semitic idioms and syntax in a Greek composition does not argue for a Semitic original but simply reflects the mixing of cultures and languages during the time in which the Wisdom of Solomon was written.  Irrespective of what may have been the background, the Wisdom of Solomon is truly a Greek composition.  Nor is there reason to assign the authorship of the book to more than one writer.  The presence of certain words and phrases throughout the book argues for its unity.

As is the case with so much of ancient literature, it is very difficult to pin down the date of composition with any degree of certainty.  A date somewhere between 100 BCE (Before the Common Era) and 50 CE (Common Era) has been the broad consensus.  A date before 70 CE is reasonable, in part because the author neither mentions nor alludes to the cataclysmic event of the destruction or the Jerusalem Temple in that year.  Some have proposed a more specific date, during the reign of Gaius Caligula (37-41 CE).  This date may be defended on two bases.  First, there is a clear undercurrent of strong persecution (see. 2:12-5:14), which would make sense in Caligula’s reign.  Second, the author’s vocabulary consists of a significant number of words and usages that are unattested elsewhere before the 1st century CE.

Wisdom of Solomon 1:16-2:1, 12-22
Chapter 1
Verse 16
16 But the ungodly by their words and deeds summoned death;
considering him a friend they pined away
and made a covenant with him,
because they are fit to belong to his company.

Chapter 2
1 For they reasoned unsoundly, saying to themselves,
“Short and sorrowful is our life,
and there is no remedy when a life comes to its end,
and no one has been known to return from Hades.

———————————————————————————————————————————–

12 “Let us lie in wait for the righteous man,
because he is inconvenient to s and opposes our actions;
he reproaches us for sins against the law,
and accuses us of sins against our training.
13 He professes to have knowledge of God,
and calls himself a child of the LORD.
14 He became to us as a reproof of our thoughts;
15 the very sight of him is a burden to us,
because his manner of life is unlike that of others,
and his ways are strange.
16  We are considered by him as something base,
and he avoids our ways as unclean;
he calls the last end of the righteous happy,
and boasts that God is his father.
17 Let us see if his words are true,
and let us test what will happen at the end of his life;
18 for if the righteous man is God’s child, he will help him,
and will deliver him from the hand of his adversaries.
19 Let us test him with insult and torture
so that we may find out how gentle he is,
and make trial of his forbearance.
20 Let us condemn him to a shameful death,
for, according to what he says, he will be protected.”

21 Thus they reasoned, but they were led astray,
for their wickedness blinded them,
22 and they did not know the secret purposes of God,
nor hoped for the wages of holiness,
nor discerned the prize for blameless souls;
23 for God created us for incorruption,
and made us in the image of his own eternity,
24 but through the devil’s envy death entered the world,
and those who belong to his company experience it.

The “Pseudegraphical” writing = someone attributed to Solomon this “wisdom”, for which he was so famous in an attempt to apply his credibility to this work.  “If Solomon wrote it then it must be good.”  By the time this was written Solomon was long dead.

As stated above, it is very likely that this book was written after Jesus died.  Re-read this passage and see how much this reading describes the events of the last hours of Jesus’ life.  Of course if it were written after Jesus died then there would be no “prophetic” aspect to it.

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Wisdom of Solomon

 

Wisdom is one of the books of the apocrypha which is not part of the bible we use.  The following is from The New Interpreter’s Study Bible:

 

The Wisdom of Solomon (also known as the book of Wisdom) is an anonymous work.  It is clear, however, that the author adopts the persona of King Solomon.  For example, the author’s quest for wisdom in Wisdom 7:1-14 can be compared to Solomon’s plea in 1 Kings 3:6-9.  Also, the author’s reference to God’s command to build the Temple (Wis. 9:7-8) can only parallel the Solomon of the OT.  Pseudepigraphal writing — i.e., writing under the assumed name of a famous person — is a well-attested genre of the ancient world, and the Wisdom of Solomon is one celebrated example.  The author of this book, therefore is conventionally referred to as “Pseudo-Solomon” (here abbreviated Ps-Solomon).

 

It is almost universally accepted that the book of Wisdom was written in Greek by an Alexandrian Jew.  Although some scholars have argued for an original Hebrew or Aramaic version, these arguments have not proved persuasive.  The presence of occasional Semitic idioms and syntax in a Greek composition does not argue for a Semitic original but simply reflects the mixing of cultures and languages during the time in which the Wisdom of Solomon was written.  Irrespective of what may have been the background, the Wisdom of Solomon is truly a Greek composition.  Nor is there reason to assign the authorship of the book to more than one writer.  The presence of certain words and phrases throughout the book argues for its unity.

 

As is the case with so much of ancient literature, it is very difficult to pin down the date of composition with any degree of certainty.  A date somewhere between 100 BCE (Before the Common Era) and 50 CE (Common Era) has been the broad consensus.  A date before 70 CE is reasonable, in part because the author neither mentions nor alludes to the cataclysmic event of the destruction or the Jerusalem Temple in that year.  Some have proposed a more specific date, during the reign of Gaius Caligula (37-41 CE).  This date may be defended on two bases.  First, there is a clear undercurrent of strong persecution (see. 2:12-5:14), which would make sense in Caligula’s reign.  Second, the author’s vocabulary consists of a significant number of words and usages that are unattested elsewhere before the 1st century CE.

 

Wisdom of Solomon 1:16-2:1, 12-22

Chapter 1

Verse 16

16 But the ungodly by their words and deeds summoned death;

                considering him a friend they pined away

                and made a covenant with him,

                because they are fit to belong to his company.

 

Chapter 2

1 For they reasoned unsoundly, saying to themselves,

                “Short and sorrowful is our life,

                and there is no remedy when a life comes to its end,

                and no one has been known to return from Hades.

 

———————————————————————————————————————————–

 

12 “Let us lie in wait for the righteous man,

    because he is inconvenient to s and opposes our actions;

    he reproaches us for sins against the law,

    and accuses us of sins against our training.

13 He professes to have knowledge of God,

    and calls himself a child of the LORD.

14 He became to us as a reproof of our thoughts;

15 the very sight of him is a burden to us,

    because his manner of life is unlike that of others,

    and his ways are strange.

16  We are considered by him as something base,

    and he avoids our ways as unclean;

    he calls the last end of the righteous happy,

    and boasts that God is his father.

17 Let us see if his words are true,

    and let us test what will happen at the end of his life;

18 for if the righteous man is God’s child, he will help him,

    and will deliver him from the hand of his adversaries.

19 Let us test him with insult and torture

    so that we may find out how gentle he is,

    and make trial of his forbearance.

20 Let us condemn him to a shameful death,

    for, according to what he says, he will be protected.”

 

21 Thus they reasoned, but they were led astray,

    for their wickedness blinded them,

22 and they did not know the secret purposes of God,

    nor hoped for the wages of holiness,

    nor discerned the prize for blameless souls;

23 for God created us for incorruption,

    and made us in the image of his own eternity,

24 but through the devil’s envy death entered the world,

    and those who belong to his company experience it.            

 

The “Pseudegraphical” writing = someone attributed to Solomon this “wisdom”, for which he was so famous in an attempt to apply his credibility to this work.  “If Solomon wrote it then it must be good.”  By the time this was written Solomon was long dead.

 

As stated above, it is very likely that this book was written after Jesus died.  Re-read this passage and see how much this reading describes the events of the last hours of Jesus’ life.  Of course if it were written after Jesus died then there would be no “prophetic” aspect to it.

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